silence
I thought of you and where you’d gone
And the world spins madly on.
x

obsol:



‣ nature
bartleby-company:

dvdp:141005
anothereddie:

dribbblepopular:

Animation Vol.l Original: http://ift.tt/1nIpIkR

ANOTHEREDDIE
design-is-fine:

Maren König, travel poster Great Autumnton, 2014. kuckenburg on tumblr.
Another example of my talented illustration students. The job: design a typical art déco travel poster. Nowadays you’ll put your idea in motion. Well done, Maren, love it!

design-is-fine:

Maren König, travel poster Great Autumnton, 2014. kuckenburg on tumblr.

Another example of my talented illustration students. The job: design a typical art déco travel poster. Nowadays you’ll put your idea in motion. Well done, Maren, love it!

smithsonianlibraries:

“Her colouring is fair, the quality of her organization fine. There is, if anything, more sensitiveness than endurance ; more activity than absolute strength ; more quickness and vivacity than actual staying power or real physical vigour. At the same time, she has considerable intensity and “go,” and is not likely to give in unless absolutely obliged.”
—Author R. Dimsdale Stocker, on the physiognomy of Ellen Beach Yaw, American soprano, in The human face as expressive of character & disposition (1900), recently digitized from the National Portrait Gallery branch of the Smithsonian Libraries.
Yes, intensity and “go,” for sure. 

smithsonianlibraries:

“Her colouring is fair, the quality of her organization fine. There is, if anything, more sensitiveness than endurance ; more activity than absolute strength ; more quickness and vivacity than actual staying power or real physical vigour. At the same time, she has considerable intensity and “go,” and is not likely to give in unless absolutely obliged.”

—Author R. Dimsdale Stocker, on the physiognomy of Ellen Beach Yaw, American soprano, in The human face as expressive of character & disposition (1900), recently digitized from the National Portrait Gallery branch of the Smithsonian Libraries.

Yes, intensity and “go,” for sure. 

smithsonianlibraries:

The Greenland Whale from Whales by Robert Hamilton (1843)
What Mr. Hamilton had to say:

Bulky as the whale is, and clumsy as it appears to be, it might be imagined that all its motions must be sluggish, and its greatest exertions productive of no great celerity. The fact, however, is the reverse. A whale extended motionless at the surface of the sea, can sink, in the space of five or six seconds, beyond the reach of its human enemies. Its velocity along the surface, and in other directions, is the same. I have observed, says Scorseby, a whale descending, after I had harpooned it, to the depth of about one-fourth of a mile, with the average velocity of seven or eight miles an hour. The usual rate, however, at which these whales swim, when on their passage from one situation to another, seldom exceeds four miles an hour. They are capable, however, for the space of a few minutes, of darting through the water with the velocity of the fastest ship under sail; and of ascending with such rapidity, as to leap entirely out of the water. This feat they sometimes perform apparently as an amusement, to the high admiration of the distant spectator; but to the no small terror of the inexperienced fisher. Sometimes the whales throw themselves into a perpendicular position, with their heads downwards, and moving their tremendous tails on high in the air, beat the water with awful violence, which, cracking like a whip, resounds to the distance of two or three miles; the sea is thrown into foam, and the air filled with vapours. This performance is denominated “lob-tailing.” (p83-84)

smithsonianlibraries:

The Greenland Whale from Whales by Robert Hamilton (1843)

What Mr. Hamilton had to say:

Bulky as the whale is, and clumsy as it appears to be, it might be imagined that all its motions must be sluggish, and its greatest exertions productive of no great celerity. The fact, however, is the reverse. A whale extended motionless at the surface of the sea, can sink, in the space of five or six seconds, beyond the reach of its human enemies. Its velocity along the surface, and in other directions, is the same. I have observed, says Scorseby, a whale descending, after I had harpooned it, to the depth of about one-fourth of a mile, with the average velocity of seven or eight miles an hour. The usual rate, however, at which these whales swim, when on their passage from one situation to another, seldom exceeds four miles an hour. They are capable, however, for the space of a few minutes, of darting through the water with the velocity of the fastest ship under sail; and of ascending with such rapidity, as to leap entirely out of the water. This feat they sometimes perform apparently as an amusement, to the high admiration of the distant spectator; but to the no small terror of the inexperienced fisher. Sometimes the whales throw themselves into a perpendicular position, with their heads downwards, and moving their tremendous tails on high in the air, beat the water with awful violence, which, cracking like a whip, resounds to the distance of two or three miles; the sea is thrown into foam, and the air filled with vapours. This performance is denominated “lob-tailing.” (p83-84)

smithsonianlibraries:

Someone lost a hat.
 ”Diligenza Per La Luna”  
Leopoldo Galluzzo and Gaetano Dura, Altre Scoverte Fatte Nella Luna dal Sigr. Herschel or Great Astronomical Discoveries, Naples, c. 1836
No guilt over adjusting this plate from a portfolio of hand-tinted lithographs supposedly showing life on the moon. 

smithsonianlibraries:

Someone lost a hat.

 ”Diligenza Per La Luna”  

Leopoldo Galluzzo and Gaetano Dura, Altre Scoverte Fatte Nella Luna dal Sigr. Herschel or Great Astronomical Discoveries, Naples, c. 1836

No guilt over adjusting this plate from a portfolio of hand-tinted lithographs supposedly showing life on the moon.